Category Archives: Cape May Hurricane

Winds begin to rip, rain begins to fall as winter storm arrives in N.J.

Winds begin to rip, rain begins to fall as winter storm arrives in N.J. (via NJ.com)

The rain expected to fall in New Jersey could change to snow tonight. Accuweather.com The wind has begun to whip and rain has started to fall in southern and central New Jersey this morning, marking the arrival of a winter storm that threatens to flood parts of the battered Jersey Shore, according…


 
About Cape May and Cape May Resort.com

Cape May is a city at the southern tip of Cape May Peninsula in Cape May County, New Jersey, where the Delaware Bay meets the Atlantic Ocean. With a rich history, award-winning beaches & boating, designation as a top birding location, and many Victorian structures, Cape May is a seaside resort drawing visitors from around the world. Cape May was recognized as one of America’s top 10 beaches by the Travel Channel and its beach was ranked fifth in New Jersey in the 2008 Top 10 Beaches.


CapeMayResort.com is a site that’s totally dedicated to the historic Cape May Resort vacation area. We have two goals – to promote our beautiful town’s local businesses and to assist potential visitors in finding anything they could want or need in and around Cape May.


This site is home to custom pages and video of easy to navigate information about Cape May- from restaurant choices to weather reports to local events in Cape May We also host a local Cape May Blog featuring  local events, Things to Do in Cape May, shopping and beach information and much more.   

 CapeMayVictorian.com is a custom photo sharing site in which you can explore local Cape May images, download your favorite vacation spot or order a custom framed picture or a one of kind gift of your vacation memory.
 Cape May Resort Blog Looking for Something to Do in Cape May New Jersey. Spend a day at the beach, or go Dolphin and Whale Watching. Visit a local winery or check out the lighthouse and sunken ship at Cape May State Park. Cape May offers beach lovers Victorian architecture, fine dining, bird watching, boating and fishing in addition to world class resort and vacation accommodations.  If you’re looking for information and reviews for your next trip to Cape may, you’ve come to the right place.Cape May Resort.com has been part of the South Jersey Cape May area since 1988. Let us put our local experience to work for you.


Click here to Save in Cape May – Save Money while visiting Cape May, check out our local Cape May Saving Coupon promotions. You can click here to print off the coupon or simply show your local Cape May Merchant your coupon on your smart phone, iPod or tablet

Book Your Favorite Hotel in Cape May and Save  – Cape May Resort.com has teamed up with Expedia offering direct on line booking of Cape May County including Cape May, Wildwood, Cape May Courthouse, Ocean City, Avalon, Somers Point, Lewes Delaware, Philadelphia and all surrounding New Jersey Shore areas.  It’s easy to go on line, search for your Cape May Hotel, Bed and Breakfast, Luxury Resort and Plan your trip to the Jersey Shore with low prices guaranteed. – See more at: http://capemayresort.com/Book-Cape-May-Hotels.html#sthash.QFS5PpZe.dpuf


http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/RNUII

Winds begin to rip, rain begins to fall as winter storm arrives in N.J.

Winds begin to rip, rain begins to fall as winter storm arrives in N.J. (via NJ.com)

The rain expected to fall in New Jersey could change to snow tonight. Accuweather.com The wind has begun to whip and rain has started to fall in southern and central New Jersey this morning, marking the arrival of a winter storm that threatens to flood parts of the battered Jersey Shore, according…


 
About Cape May and Cape May Resort.com

Cape May is a city at the southern tip of Cape May Peninsula in Cape May County, New Jersey, where the Delaware Bay meets the Atlantic Ocean. With a rich history, award-winning beaches & boating, designation as a top birding location, and many Victorian structures, Cape May is a seaside resort drawing visitors from around the world. Cape May was recognized as one of America’s top 10 beaches by the Travel Channel and its beach was ranked fifth in New Jersey in the 2008 Top 10 Beaches.


CapeMayResort.com is a site that’s totally dedicated to the historic Cape May Resort vacation area. We have two goals – to promote our beautiful town’s local businesses and to assist potential visitors in finding anything they could want or need in and around Cape May.


This site is home to custom pages and video of easy to navigate information about Cape May- from restaurant choices to weather reports to local events in Cape May We also host a local Cape May Blog featuring  local events, Things to Do in Cape May, shopping and beach information and much more.   

 CapeMayVictorian.com is a custom photo sharing site in which you can explore local Cape May images, download your favorite vacation spot or order a custom framed picture or a one of kind gift of your vacation memory.
 Cape May Resort Blog Looking for Something to Do in Cape May New Jersey. Spend a day at the beach, or go Dolphin and Whale Watching. Visit a local winery or check out the lighthouse and sunken ship at Cape May State Park. Cape May offers beach lovers Victorian architecture, fine dining, bird watching, boating and fishing in addition to world class resort and vacation accommodations.  If you’re looking for information and reviews for your next trip to Cape may, you’ve come to the right place.Cape May Resort.com has been part of the South Jersey Cape May area since 1988. Let us put our local experience to work for you.


Click here to Save in Cape May – Save Money while visiting Cape May, check out our local Cape May Saving Coupon promotions. You can click here to print off the coupon or simply show your local Cape May Merchant your coupon on your smart phone, iPod or tablet

Book Your Favorite Hotel in Cape May and Save  – Cape May Resort.com has teamed up with Expedia offering direct on line booking of Cape May County including Cape May, Wildwood, Cape May Courthouse, Ocean City, Avalon, Somers Point, Lewes Delaware, Philadelphia and all surrounding New Jersey Shore areas.  It’s easy to go on line, search for your Cape May Hotel, Bed and Breakfast, Luxury Resort and Plan your trip to the Jersey Shore with low prices guaranteed. – See more at: http://capemayresort.com/Book-Cape-May-Hotels.html#sthash.QFS5PpZe.dpuf


http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/RNUII

A Strong Nor’easter has been upgraded to a Winter Storm at the Jersey Shore

A strong nor’easter that’s been upgraded to a “winter storm” is forecast to wallop the already battered Shore and the Philadelphia region starting this afternoon into evening, bringing 50 m.p.h. winds and up to four inches of snow.

Cape May NJ Winter Storm predicted for November 7 -8

The timing isn’t good, with parts of New Jersey and New York still working to recover from the high winds and record storm surges of Hurricane Sandy, which struck Oct. 29. More than 300,000 homes and businesses were still without power this morning from New Jersey’s Ocean County to densely populated North Jersey.

The Shore will likely see rain, with snow falling inland along the I-95 corridor, according to Jim Hayes, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Mount Holly.

“The barrier islands will get rain and winds of 60 m.p.h.,” Hayes said. “So any recovery effort will be hampered by the fact that they are going to get really strong winds in southern Ocean, Atlantic and into Cape May Counties. They could see an inch or two of rain, but it won’t be that big of a problem.”

Hayes explained that the nor’easter will not create tidal surges anywhere near the ones created by Sandy.

“This is an intense nor’easter – don’t get me wrong,” he added. “… We will see additional erosion. Anything made vulnerable by Sandy will be left open today.”

The storm shouldn’t “be anywhere near the magnitude of Sandy … but we’re taking it seriously,” said Bill Gee, of the Ocean County Emergency Management Office, and a deputy fire marshall. It’s likely, he said, that no one will be allowed to enter the barrier islands, such as Long Beach Island, which were devastated by Sandy. Towns were being evacuated in low-lying areas. And officials are watching Mantoloking where the ocean flowed into the bay and washed out the main bridge connecting to the mainland.

Protective dunes were also wiped out in many areas, and workers have been busy erecting berms up and down the shoreline. The new storm should only be impacted by one high tide, and not multiple high tides as with Sandy, Gee said.

As of early this morning, the nor’easter was in North Carolina and making its way up the coast. It was forecast to strike New Jersey this afternoon and into the evening. Rain will fall this morning, but the storm will drag in colder air, dropping temperatures to just above freezing by early evening.

Snow is expected to then start to fall. However, on a positive note, the ground is still warm because it’s early November. So snow should not lay for long on roads. Rather, it will likely accumulate on grass and cars. Hayes said it’s tricky to call how much snow will fall, but he believes it will be about three to four inches in the Philadelphia-South Jersey area.

The storm will linger into Thursday before moving onto New England.

For more information on the storm visit google public alerts

Frank Kummer, Breaking News Desk
POSTED: Wednesday, November 7, 2012, 6:18 AM

http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/RNUII

A Strong Nor’easter has been upgraded to a Winter Storm at the Jersey Shore

A strong nor’easter that’s been upgraded to a “winter storm” is forecast to wallop the already battered Shore and the Philadelphia region starting this afternoon into evening, bringing 50 m.p.h. winds and up to four inches of snow.

Cape May NJ Winter Storm predicted for November 7 -8

The timing isn’t good, with parts of New Jersey and New York still working to recover from the high winds and record storm surges of Hurricane Sandy, which struck Oct. 29. More than 300,000 homes and businesses were still without power this morning from New Jersey’s Ocean County to densely populated North Jersey.

The Shore will likely see rain, with snow falling inland along the I-95 corridor, according to Jim Hayes, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Mount Holly.

“The barrier islands will get rain and winds of 60 m.p.h.,” Hayes said. “So any recovery effort will be hampered by the fact that they are going to get really strong winds in southern Ocean, Atlantic and into Cape May Counties. They could see an inch or two of rain, but it won’t be that big of a problem.”

Hayes explained that the nor’easter will not create tidal surges anywhere near the ones created by Sandy.

“This is an intense nor’easter – don’t get me wrong,” he added. “… We will see additional erosion. Anything made vulnerable by Sandy will be left open today.”

The storm shouldn’t “be anywhere near the magnitude of Sandy … but we’re taking it seriously,” said Bill Gee, of the Ocean County Emergency Management Office, and a deputy fire marshall. It’s likely, he said, that no one will be allowed to enter the barrier islands, such as Long Beach Island, which were devastated by Sandy. Towns were being evacuated in low-lying areas. And officials are watching Mantoloking where the ocean flowed into the bay and washed out the main bridge connecting to the mainland.

Protective dunes were also wiped out in many areas, and workers have been busy erecting berms up and down the shoreline. The new storm should only be impacted by one high tide, and not multiple high tides as with Sandy, Gee said.

As of early this morning, the nor’easter was in North Carolina and making its way up the coast. It was forecast to strike New Jersey this afternoon and into the evening. Rain will fall this morning, but the storm will drag in colder air, dropping temperatures to just above freezing by early evening.

Snow is expected to then start to fall. However, on a positive note, the ground is still warm because it’s early November. So snow should not lay for long on roads. Rather, it will likely accumulate on grass and cars. Hayes said it’s tricky to call how much snow will fall, but he believes it will be about three to four inches in the Philadelphia-South Jersey area.

The storm will linger into Thursday before moving onto New England.

For more information on the storm visit google public alerts

Frank Kummer, Breaking News Desk
POSTED: Wednesday, November 7, 2012, 6:18 AM

http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/RNUII

FEMA officials are on the ground in New Jersey

FEMA officials are on the ground in New Jersey but it may be a day or two before they decide where and when to open disaster recovery centers.

For now, the agency is directing those in need to the American Red Cross, which is operating shelters around the state, which sustained widespread damage from Hurricane Sandy.

The FEMA web site has a Sandy page where residents can apply for disaster relief.

Laura Kirkpatrick of the Monmouth County Office of Emergency Management said she’s received numerous calls about FEMA relief.

“They haven’t established offices in Monmouth County yet,” Kirkpatrick said Wednesday night. “But it’s only been 24 hours since we saw the extent of the damage. We have 262,804 power outages in Monmouth County. That’s out of 282,798 customers in the county.”

‘We have 262,804 power outages in Monmouth County. That’s out of 282,798 customers in the county’
The FEMA web site should be updated within the next day or two with information on local facilities, according to FEMA spokeswoman Becca Wexler.

Federal aid is available for residents in the counties of Atlantic, Cape May, Essex, Hudson, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean and Union. The disaster teams are assessing the damage in other areas of the state to decide whether more federal funding is warranted.

FEMA will provide assistance with temporary housing, home repairs and loans to cover uninsured property loss.

To apply for FEMA help, visit disasterassistance.gov or call             (800) 621-3362      .

For information on the Red Cross centers, visit redcross.org

http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/RNUII

FEMA officials are on the ground in New Jersey

FEMA officials are on the ground in New Jersey but it may be a day or two before they decide where and when to open disaster recovery centers.

For now, the agency is directing those in need to the American Red Cross, which is operating shelters around the state, which sustained widespread damage from Hurricane Sandy.

The FEMA web site has a Sandy page where residents can apply for disaster relief.

Laura Kirkpatrick of the Monmouth County Office of Emergency Management said she’s received numerous calls about FEMA relief.

“They haven’t established offices in Monmouth County yet,” Kirkpatrick said Wednesday night. “But it’s only been 24 hours since we saw the extent of the damage. We have 262,804 power outages in Monmouth County. That’s out of 282,798 customers in the county.”

‘We have 262,804 power outages in Monmouth County. That’s out of 282,798 customers in the county’
The FEMA web site should be updated within the next day or two with information on local facilities, according to FEMA spokeswoman Becca Wexler.

Federal aid is available for residents in the counties of Atlantic, Cape May, Essex, Hudson, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean and Union. The disaster teams are assessing the damage in other areas of the state to decide whether more federal funding is warranted.

FEMA will provide assistance with temporary housing, home repairs and loans to cover uninsured property loss.

To apply for FEMA help, visit disasterassistance.gov or call             (800) 621-3362      .

For information on the Red Cross centers, visit redcross.org

http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/RNUII

The eye of Hurricane Sandy has passed over Cape May County

COURT HOUSE — Sandy has visited Cape May County, said Lenora Bonifonte, Cape May County Communications Director. The hurricane passed through the county from 6:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Oct. 29.

While the hurricane made a quick visit once it made landfall, weather leading up to it brought the county to a standstill. Sustained winds throughout the day were measured at 50 to 55 mph with gusts up to 75 mph. Wave heights reached 15 to 23 feet.

“We experienced heavy rain and winds today with estimates of over 8 inches of rain, a storm surge reported up to 15 feet caused severe flooding on barrier islands,’ said Bonifonte. “Flood waters did not recede. That, combined with a full moon brings concern for high tide tonight approximately at 8:30 p.m. on the ocean, 9:30 p.m. on back bay with record flooding anticipated.”

According to the National Weather Service in Mt. Holly, at 5 p.m. Oct. 29, Sandy was a Category 1 hurricane. It has now transitioned into an extremely intense Nor’easter.

Residents of barrier islands and bay side communities experienced mandatory evacuations as Sandy made its way toward the county. Residents who did not opt to heed the call for evacuation are being asked to shelter in place while first responders and police assess the situation on the islands before going onto the islands to assist those who did not leave.

According to Bonifonte, municipalities on the barrier islands are reporting extreme beach erosion.

Four National Guard trucks were stationed in the county to assist with rescues. Approximately 50 people in Ocean City and Strathmere were rescued, said Bonifonte.

Atlantic City Electric reports 15,540 customers without power.

Five shelters located throughout the county are housing 509 evacuees. Upper Township Middle School in Petersburg is at capacity with 121, Woodbine Developmental Center is at capacity with 259; Upper Township Elementary School in Marmora with 5; Villas Fire Hall (taking Lower Township residents only) 39; and Middle Township Elementary School No. 2 with 85.

The eye of Hurricane Sandy has passed over Cape May County, however its effects will be felt overnight.

Tonight: rain. Low around 49. Very windy, with a south wind 48 to 55 mph, with gusts as high as 80 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New precipitation amounts between three quarters and one inch possible.

Tuesday: Rain likely, mainly before 10 a.m. cloudy, with a high near 55. Very windy, with a south wind 42 to 47 mph decreasing to 36 to 41 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 75 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New precipitation amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.

Tuesday Nigh:t A chance of showers. Cloudy, with a low around 45. Breezy, with a south wind 17 to 25 mph, with gusts as high as 39 mph. Chance of precipitation is 50%. New precipitation amounts of less than a tenth of an inch possible.

http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/RNUII

Hurricane Sandy: 5 PM ET, 90 mph winds, Cat 1, 940 mb, moving WNW at 28 mph. Sandy will make landfall within 2 hrs near Cape May, NJ

Hurricane Sandy: 5 PM ET, 90 mph winds, Cat 1, 940 mb, moving WNW at 28 mph. Sandy will make landfall within 2 hrs near Cape May, NJ

CAPE MAY — Get out while you can. That’s the plea Cape May County officials made to residents planning on hunkering down in the barrier islands tonight.
About 60 percent of the barrier islands have been evacuated, according to Freeholder Director Gerald Thornton, who called Hurricane Sandy “the worst-case scenario for any storm that we have experienced.”



“I’m going to emphasize again while this little bit of time is left, if there’s any way possible you can leave those barrier islands, leave. Leave. You’re in danger,” Thornton said. “Look, we’re at the last instant here. This is the last hour. You’re not going to see any more warnings here.”
Thornton said there is serious flooding on barrier islands throughout the county with reports of water in some town reaching 5 feet.
“We’re requesting again that people that didn’t evacuate the barrier islands, please evacuate now. The next high tide is scheduled at 8:35 tonight and that would be about 45 minutes later on the back bays. So there still is some time to evacuate,” said Martin Pagliughi, the Emergency Management Coordinator for Cape May County.
“I’m going to emphasize again… if there’s any way possible you can leave those barrier islands, leave. Leave. You’™re in danger.”
Pagliughi said both North Wildwood and Sea Isle City had to put out structural fires today.
During the response in Sea Isle, a National Guard truck that was brought in to portable pumps to try to fight the fire collided with a civilian vehicle. Pagliughi said three people, both national guard personnel and civilians, were hurt in the accident, but didn’t have other details on the extent of the injuries.
According to officials about 600 people are staying in shelters and more than 7,600 people are out of power, but as the wind picks up more residents are expected to lose power.
“It’s a large storm of epic proportions that we’ve never seen here in Cape May County before,” Pagliughi said. “We’re begging you, please leave the islands tonight.”
http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/RNUII

The eye of Hurricane Sandy has passed over Cape May County

COURT HOUSE — Sandy has visited Cape May County, said Lenora Bonifonte, Cape May County Communications Director. The hurricane passed through the county from 6:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Oct. 29.

While the hurricane made a quick visit once it made landfall, weather leading up to it brought the county to a standstill. Sustained winds throughout the day were measured at 50 to 55 mph with gusts up to 75 mph. Wave heights reached 15 to 23 feet.

“We experienced heavy rain and winds today with estimates of over 8 inches of rain, a storm surge reported up to 15 feet caused severe flooding on barrier islands,’ said Bonifonte. “Flood waters did not recede. That, combined with a full moon brings concern for high tide tonight approximately at 8:30 p.m. on the ocean, 9:30 p.m. on back bay with record flooding anticipated.”

According to the National Weather Service in Mt. Holly, at 5 p.m. Oct. 29, Sandy was a Category 1 hurricane. It has now transitioned into an extremely intense Nor’easter.

Residents of barrier islands and bay side communities experienced mandatory evacuations as Sandy made its way toward the county. Residents who did not opt to heed the call for evacuation are being asked to shelter in place while first responders and police assess the situation on the islands before going onto the islands to assist those who did not leave.

According to Bonifonte, municipalities on the barrier islands are reporting extreme beach erosion.

Four National Guard trucks were stationed in the county to assist with rescues. Approximately 50 people in Ocean City and Strathmere were rescued, said Bonifonte.

Atlantic City Electric reports 15,540 customers without power.

Five shelters located throughout the county are housing 509 evacuees. Upper Township Middle School in Petersburg is at capacity with 121, Woodbine Developmental Center is at capacity with 259; Upper Township Elementary School in Marmora with 5; Villas Fire Hall (taking Lower Township residents only) 39; and Middle Township Elementary School No. 2 with 85.

The eye of Hurricane Sandy has passed over Cape May County, however its effects will be felt overnight.

Tonight: rain. Low around 49. Very windy, with a south wind 48 to 55 mph, with gusts as high as 80 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New precipitation amounts between three quarters and one inch possible.

Tuesday: Rain likely, mainly before 10 a.m. cloudy, with a high near 55. Very windy, with a south wind 42 to 47 mph decreasing to 36 to 41 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 75 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New precipitation amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.

Tuesday Nigh:t A chance of showers. Cloudy, with a low around 45. Breezy, with a south wind 17 to 25 mph, with gusts as high as 39 mph. Chance of precipitation is 50%. New precipitation amounts of less than a tenth of an inch possible.

http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/RNUII

Hurricane Sandy: 5 PM ET, 90 mph winds, Cat 1, 940 mb, moving WNW at 28 mph. Sandy will make landfall within 2 hrs near Cape May, NJ

Hurricane Sandy: 5 PM ET, 90 mph winds, Cat 1, 940 mb, moving WNW at 28 mph. Sandy will make landfall within 2 hrs near Cape May, NJ

CAPE MAY — Get out while you can. That’s the plea Cape May County officials made to residents planning on hunkering down in the barrier islands tonight.
About 60 percent of the barrier islands have been evacuated, according to Freeholder Director Gerald Thornton, who called Hurricane Sandy “the worst-case scenario for any storm that we have experienced.”



“I’m going to emphasize again while this little bit of time is left, if there’s any way possible you can leave those barrier islands, leave. Leave. You’re in danger,” Thornton said. “Look, we’re at the last instant here. This is the last hour. You’re not going to see any more warnings here.”
Thornton said there is serious flooding on barrier islands throughout the county with reports of water in some town reaching 5 feet.
“We’re requesting again that people that didn’t evacuate the barrier islands, please evacuate now. The next high tide is scheduled at 8:35 tonight and that would be about 45 minutes later on the back bays. So there still is some time to evacuate,” said Martin Pagliughi, the Emergency Management Coordinator for Cape May County.
“I’m going to emphasize again… if there’s any way possible you can leave those barrier islands, leave. Leave. You’™re in danger.”
Pagliughi said both North Wildwood and Sea Isle City had to put out structural fires today.
During the response in Sea Isle, a National Guard truck that was brought in to portable pumps to try to fight the fire collided with a civilian vehicle. Pagliughi said three people, both national guard personnel and civilians, were hurt in the accident, but didn’t have other details on the extent of the injuries.
According to officials about 600 people are staying in shelters and more than 7,600 people are out of power, but as the wind picks up more residents are expected to lose power.
“It’s a large storm of epic proportions that we’ve never seen here in Cape May County before,” Pagliughi said. “We’re begging you, please leave the islands tonight.”
http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/RNUII